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It’s Time to Get Up and Move

Tuesday, July 1, 2014

Reimbursement for preventive services has been a highlight of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), particularly when it relates to colorectal cancer screening colonoscopies. However, as a recent study indicates, preventive measures do not always require a trip to the doctors.

New research zeroed in on 43 studies that specifically looked at the link between sitting and nearly 70,000 cases of cancer. The study suggests that people who sit for long periods of time have an increased risk of developing colon cancer. As people become increasingly sedentary due to longer commutes, jobs that require prolonged periods of working behind a computer, and the amount of leisure time spent sitting in front of a television, a consistent relationship between hours spent sitting and an increased risk for colon cancer became apparent.

The study suggests that the negative effects of long periods of sitting are not negated by regular or daily exercise, but by breaking up the extended periods of sitting. The good news is that risks can be decreased by becoming more active. Physical activity and less time spent sitting means a lesser risk of developing colon cancer that is the result of a sedentary lifestyle. It’s time to get up and move.

How about taking that next phone call standing up or walking around during commercial breaks? Please be advised that a less sedentary lifestyle will not eliminate your risk for colon cancer, but it will decrease your chances. Even though a more active lifestyle is important, it does not replace the need for screening colonoscopies. Considering one in 20 Americans will develop this type of cancer at some point in their lives, colorectal cancer screenings are vitally important as a preventive measure.

Judy Behm
Preventing Colorectal Cancer

A New Recommendation for Colon Cancer Screening Age May Be on the Horizon

Wednesday, June 4, 2014

The national guidelines recommended for colon cancer screening has been to start at age 50 and continue through age 75. New research studies as reported by US News Health  carried out by Erasmus University in the Netherlands and New York's Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center has shown there are benefits to screening after age 75 and not just for healthy patients.

According to the study’s’ findings someone who’s very healthy should consider colon cancer screening up to age 86 and even those in poor health could benefit from some form of screening up to age 80. It was suggested that although a colonoscopy was the best screening test up to age 83 a stool test was a better option for the 85 to 86 year old.

Judy Behm
Preventing Colorectal Cancer

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